The Honest Folk of Guadeloupe | Soho Press | Soho Press is an independent book publisher located in New York City.

The Honest Folk of Guadeloupe

Timothy Williams

ISBN: 9781616953850

Published: January, 2015

Pricing

Paperback $15.95

More books by Timothy Williams

Timothy Williams

French West Indies

View More

Description

April 1990, Guadeloupe: The body of a female French tourist has been discovered on a nudist beach. The victim’s remains offer no clues about her final hours. What turned this woman’s vacation in paradise into a nightmare? French-Algerian judge Anne Marie Laveaud is assigned the high-profile case. As always, the story of a murdered whi...

April 1990, Guadeloupe: The body of a female French tourist has been discovered on a nudist beach. The victim’s remains offer no clues about her final hours. What turned this woman’s vacation in paradise into a nightmare? French-Algerian judge Anne Marie Laveaud is assigned the high-profile case. As always, the story of a murdered white woman has attracted the attention of international media. The economy of Guadeloupe, so dependent on the tourist industry, could suffer a terrible hit if this case isn’t brought police work.

Buy from Soho and Save!

Choose a retailer

Media

“Sharp-witted, French-Algerian Anne Marie is an investigator worthy of a following, and Williams has craftily created her story as a microcosm of Guadeloupe’s social situation, where alienation battles dependence and racial stratification rules. Williams digs deep below the exotic setting’s surface in this nuanced mystery. ”
—Booklist on The Honest Folk of Guadeloupe
“Absorbing ... Laden with Insights about the legacies colonialism, such as nuanced racism, official corruption, and troubled interactions between men and women. ”
—Publishers Weekly on The Honest Folk of Guadeloupe
“Anne Marie's second appearance, courtesy of the author of the Piero Trotti crime novels, boasts an elegantly incisive narrative and a fascinating heroine.”
—Kirkus Reviews
“[A] close look at the folk of Guadeloupe and the West Indian culture in general, with its mix of races and lingering colonial resentment of Mother France.”
—Gumshoe Review