The Revolution According to Raymundo Mata

Gina Apostol

ISBN: 9781641291835

Published: August 4, 2020

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eBook $14.99

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Description

The first ever US publication of Gina Apostol's Philippine National Book Award–winning novel.

Raymundo Mata is a visually impaired member of an anti-Spanish Philippine revolutionary society. Told in the form of a memoir, the novel traces Mata's childhood, his education in Manila, his love affairs, and his discovery o...

The first ever US publication of Gina Apostol’s Philippine National Book Award–winning novel.

Raymundo Mata is a visually impaired member of an anti-Spanish Philippine revolutionary society. Told in the form of a memoir, the novel traces Mata’s childhood, his education in Manila, his love affairs, and his discovery of José Rizal and his books (Rizal is a real historical figure: an ophthalmologist by profession, he became a novelist and polemicist, and is considered the revolutionary father of Philippine independence and the nation’s great writer; he was executed by the Spanish for his revolutionary activities) which in turn involves him with the Philippine Revolution and, ultimately, Makamisa, Rizal’s third and unfinished novel.

Raymundo Mata’s autobiography, however, is de-centered by another story: that of the development of the book. In the foreword(s), afterword(s), and footnotes, we see the translator Mimi C. Magsalin (a pseudonym), the rabid nationalist editor Estrella Espejo, and the neo-Freudian psychoanalyst critic Dr. Diwata Drake make multiple readings of the Mata manuscript. Inevitably, clashes between these readings occur throughout the novel, and in the end no singular and comprehensive interpretation arises: depending on which interpretation the reader follows, one may either conclude that the manuscript contains and/or is Makamisa, or that it is an elaborate hoax perpetuated by the translator.

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“Gina Apostol’s The Revolution According to Raymundo Mata weaves the complex tangle of Philippine history, literature, and languages (along with contemporary academic scholarship) into a brilliant tour de force of a novel. Brava!”
—John Barth
“Gina Apostol tells our revolutionary history—or fragments of our history—using a pastiche of writing from the academe, a diary, stories within stories, jokes, puns, allusions, a virtual firecracker of words. Her novel is fearlessly intellectual, anchored firmly on the theories of Jacques Lacan. But it is also funny and witty as it picks—lice, nits, and all—on the hoaxes in our history. It affirms, if it still needs to be affirmed, the power of fiction to shape and reshape the gaps in the narratives of our history as a nation. The main character here is History, and its protagonist, Imagination. For this audacious sword-play of a novel, the National Book Award is given to Gina Apostol’s The Revolution According to Raymundo Mata.”
—Judges' Citation, Philippine National Book Award
“Edward Said wrote that the role of the intellectual is to present alternative narratives on history than those provided by the ‘combatants’ who claim entitlement to official memory and national identity—who propagate ‘heroic anthems sung in order to sweep all before them.’ In this fearlessly intellectual novel, Gina Apostol takes on the keepers of official memory and creates a new, atonal anthem that defies single ownership and, in fact, can only be performed by the many—by multiple voices in multiple readings. We may never look at ourselves and our history the same way again. ”
—Eric Gamalinda, author of My Sad Republic