Blood of the Wicked | Soho Press | Soho Press is an independent book publisher located in New York City.

Blood of the Wicked

Leighton Gage

ISBN: 9781569474709

Published: January 2008

Pricing

Paperback $9.99

Leighton Gage

Brazil

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Description

In the remote Brazilian town of Cascatas do Pontal, where landless peasants are confronting the owners of vast estates, the bishop arrives by helicopter to consecrate a new church and is assassinated.

Mario Silva, chief inspector for criminal matters of the federal police of Brazil, is dispatched to the interior to find the killer. The...

In the remote Brazilian town of Cascatas do Pontal, where landless peasants are confronting the owners of vast estates, the bishop arrives by helicopter to consecrate a new church and is assassinated.

Mario Silva, chief inspector for criminal matters of the federal police of Brazil, is dispatched to the interior to find the killer. The pope himself has called Brazil’s president; the pressure is on Silva to perform. Assisted by his nephew, Hector Costa, also a federal policeman, Silva must battle the state police and a corrupt judiciary as well as criminals who prey on street kids, the warring factions of the Landless League, the big landowners, and the church itself, in order to solve the initial murder and several brutal killings that follow. Justice is hard to come by. An old priest, a secret liberation theologist, finally metes it out. Here is a Brazil that tourists never encounter.

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Media

“Top notch ... controversial and entirely absorbing.”
—The New York Times Book Review
“A dark, violent book with characters that seethe on the page ... compelling writing. Readers will smell the steam and stench of the Amazon and recoil from the torture and depredation from which Gage averts his lens, barely in time.”
—Boston Globe
“Masterful.”
—The Toronto Globe and Mail
“Mr. Gage is a master of the procedural who paints with a fine brush, using the tools he needs to craft a fine novel and no more.”
—The New York Journal of Books